24 Nov -

Curbside Christmas tree pickup no longer available in Calgary

Once Christmas has come and gone, don’t try leaving your tree out with your garbage like you used to.

Although the City of Calgary previously picked up dead trees, they will no longer be participating in door-to-door pickup in 2016 as a cost-saving measure. Instead, Calgarians are asked to take their trees to one of 16 temporary drop-off locations throughout the city.

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    READ MORE: Christmas in Calgary 2016: 15 family-friendly events to check out

    All of the trees collected will be chipped and turned into mulch for Calgarians to use again. The mulch from recycled Christmas trees is available to residents for free from the East Calgary Landfill, while supplies last.

    “Calgarians have always been really keen to help us keep trees out of our landfills,” Sharon Howland with Waste and Recycling Services said in a news release.

    “If everyone helps by meeting us half way, we’ll still be able to turn the trees into mulch while also saving taxpayers quite a bit of money.”

    All 16 temporary tree drop-off locations are open from Dec. 26 to Jan. 31:

    Bowness – By the community recycling depot, 7937 43 Ave. N.W.Confederation Park – East parking lot, 905 30 Ave. N.W.Prairie Winds Park – South parking lot, 54 Ave. & Castleridge Blvd. N.EHuntington Hills Athletic Park – 7920 4 St. at Huntstrom Dr. N.E.Bottomlands Park – St. George’s Dr. & 7 Ave. N.E.Marda Loop Communities Association – 3130 16 St. S.W.Parks Compound – 10312 Sacramento Dr. S.W.North Glenmore Park – 6615 37 St. S.W.Woodbine Athletic Park – 96 Woodfield Dr. S.W.Park 96 – 14660 Parkland Blvd. S.E.Pop Davies/Ogden Athletic Park – Ogden Rd. & Millican Rd. S.E.IKEA – 8000 11 St. S.E. (northwest corner of parking lot behind store)Auburn Bay Off Leash Area – 52 St. & Auburn Bay Dr. S.E.Spyhill Landfill* – 69 St. & 112 Ave. N.W.East Calgary Landfill* – 17 Ave. and 68 St. S.E.Shepard Landfill* – 114 Ave. and 68 St. S.E.

    Lights, ornaments, tinsel, string, garland and tree stands must be removed from trees before recycling.

    In addition, Calgarians are asked to not wrap, bag or tie their tree.

    For more information about the city’s Christmas tree recycling program, visit calgary长沙夜网/christmastree.

24 Nov -

Top 5 things to do while stuck at YYC Calgary International Airport during the holidays

Looking for something to do at the Calgary airport while you wait for your flight this holiday season? If you were contemplating talking to the aggressive beauty kiosk salespeople just to pass the time, fear not! YYC Calgary International Airport has lots of ideas on what you can do instead, plus over 185 shops and services for your last-minute shopping needs.

You can also use the hashtag #YYCFestive on Facebook, 桑拿会所 and Instagram to share your holiday moments with others in the airport.

Get your smooch on at the mistletoe zones

You can meet your friends/ family / lovers / unsuspecting strangers under the mistletoe on the Arrivals Level at meeting places A, C and D/E and surprise them with a Christmas kiss!

Listen to some sweet holiday singing

There are seasonal melodies being performed by multicultural choirs, local artists and musical school groups on the Arrivals Level of the new international terminal. If you haven’t had your fill of Christmas music yet, this option is for you! Check out the full schedule here.

Hoping to hear about Frosty, Rudolph and all the other Christmas characters? Check out the seasonal music throughout the airport.

Calgary Airport Authority

Take in YYC’s Festival of Trees

The trees, decorated by the airport’s partners and businesses, have been put up for an “added a dose of seasonal cheer” according to YYC staff. They are located in the Destinations Food Court, Banff Hall and international arrivals and departures.

Use the free gift-wrapping service

Volunteers will be wrapping presents for those travelling between 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Dec. 21 and 22 and again from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Dec. 23. Note: this takes place in Concourses A and C behind security, so make sure you have the gift in your carry-on bag.

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  • What travellers need to know about the Calgary airport’s new terminal

    Colour with Mrs. Claus

    Mrs. Claus and her helpers will be at Concourses A and C on Dec. 22 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Dec. 23 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. to help write letters to Santa. The airport staff say she may even have some “delicious treats” to share.

    If you’re not in the mood to be merry, but are still looking for options to pass the time, here are five more options all year-round at the airport:

    Unleash your kids in the play

    New Kid Zones have been specially designed for “interactive play and exploration” in the international terminal. They’re carved by hand by Denver’s Playtime LLC and feature carpet-covered foam floors, easy for kids of all ages to play. There’s a dinosaur theme area on the arrivals level, an aviation theme and Calgary Stampede theme in the international departures hall and an Alberta wildlife theme in the U.S. departures hall.

    The play zones at the Calgary airport have special foam floor for kids.

    Calgary Airport Authority

    Get some dog love

    Therapy dogs roam the airport during peak travel times every Thursday to Saturday to help “enhance the passenger experience.” Called Pre-Board Pals, it’s a partnership between The Calgary Airport Authority and Calgary’s Pet Access League Society (PALS). You can identify them with their “pet me” vests, white bandanas and human companions. Click here for more information, including if you’re interested in volunteering.

    Meet some furry friends while you wait for your flight.

    Wishlist Productions

    Hit up the arcade

    Flippers Arcades are in four spots in the airport pre- and post-security in the Canada departures section and Concourse A. You can play video games and pinball machines until they call your flight number.

    Exercise while charging your phone

    In the new international terminal’s U.S. departures hall, you can try out the WeWatt electronics charging station–a three-seated stationary bike that converts human pedal power into electricity so you can charge your device. Developed in Belgium, it’s the first such amenity in a Canadian airport. (The others are in Brussels Airport, Amsterdam’s Schiphol airport and railway stations throughout Belgium and France).

    Learn about space and aeronautics at SpacePort

    SpacePort is free and open Monday to Friday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. and weekends 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The airport calls it a “unique educational and entertainment facility focusing on space and aeronautics.” You can find the hands-on exhibits and displays on the third floor after taking the elevator/escalator up from the departures level to the Destinations Food Court area.

24 Nov -

Saanich dog experiences opioid overdose after accidental exposure at Mount Douglas Park

A six-month pug cross puppy in Saanich is back to her normal self after experiencing what one veterinarian thinks was an opioid overdose last week.

On Friday, Chica was out for a walk with her owner in Mount Douglas Park. Even though she was on a leash, it appears Chica ingested something off the ground and fell sick.

Dr. Helen Rae with McKenzie Veterinary Services says Chica came into their emergency clinic later that afternoon and was wobbly, but still conscious and responsive.

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Rae’s initial reaction was to check Chica for marijuana toxicity, because it’s quite common, but her symptoms did not fully fit the picture.

Rae says Chica looked heavily sedated and could not keep her head up.

“We got her to throw up and gave her some medication that helps to stop further absorption of the toxin,” she said. “Within an hour of her presenting at the clinic, she was pretty much comatose and almost not responsive.”

Rae figured there could be a potent drug at play and that’s when she decided to use her naloxone kit.

She says it is quite common for some veterinary clinics to use narcotics for surgeries, so many of them carry Narcan, a kit containing medication that can reverse the symptoms of an opioid overdose.

“I thought I really didn’t have much to lose by trying a low dose and sure enough it worked,” Rae said. “Chica went from being comatose to lifting her head up in about five minutes. I then gave her another small dose and she sat up.”

At that point, Rae knew an opioid was most likely to blame for Chica’s symptoms.

“I don’t know if it was fentanyl. All I can say is —; it was some form of an opioid. There is not anything else that would respond like that to naloxone,” she said.

Fentanyl has been at the forefront of the public health emergency declared in B.C. in April after a soaring number of overdose deaths was recorded by the Coroners Service. The most recent numbers released on Monday suggest 128 people died from illicit drug use in November in B.C., bringing the total for the year to 755 people.

The majority of people are dying due to fentanyl use. From Jan. 1 through Oct. 31, the coroners service says fentanyl was detected in 374 cases, which is about 60 per cent of all illicit drug deaths.

READ MORE: 128 people in B.C. died from illicit drug use in November

Rae says it’s the second case of opioid exposure in dogs in her 18-year practice.

Seven years ago, a dog that accidentally ingested human excrement at a local park showed very similar symptoms, was similarly treated with naloxone and responded well.

Rae says, just like in humans, depending on how much opioid a dog ingests, the exposure can be fatal.

“I think the chances of this happening are still very slim,” she said. “It’s getting a lot of attention because of fentanyl being in the news, but I still think it’s a rarity.”

She says there are some signs to look out for if you suspect your pet might be experiencing an opioid overdose.

They are likely to have progressive symptoms of very profound sedation, something that’s unique to an opioid overdose and not really seen with any other type of toxicity in animals.

Rae says in Chica’s case, another sign of an opioid exposure was that her pupils were very constricted.

“It was the combination of those two things and the fact that she did not have other symptoms,” she said. “Most other toxicities are going to have other symptoms, such as tremoring or vomiting. They were not there in her case.”

Rae says Chica was still a little sleepy when she was sent home the same day, but was more or less back to her normal self the next day.

PHOTO GALLERY: Chica is back to being a carefree puppy at her home in Saanich 

24 Nov -

Your Saskatchewan – Regina: December 2016

Every day on Global Regina at 6 p.m. and 10 p.m., we feature a viewer submitted photo for Your Saskatchewan.

Submit your photo with a description and location via Facebook, 桑拿会所 or by email to [email protected]长沙夜网.

Photos should be added to the email as an attachment, in jpeg format, landscape orientation and at least 920 pixels wide.

READ MORE: Your Saskatchewan – Regina: November 2016

Dec. 2: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Curt Borys along the Saskatoon River.

Dec. 1: This Your Saskatchewan photo of a snowy owl was taken by Philippe Gaudet near Humbolt, Sask.

Dec. 5: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Francisco Sosa in Regina, Sask.

Dec. 6: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Wanda Larose in Ferguson Bay, Sask.

Dec. 7: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by John Eagle in the Prince Albert National Park.

Dec. 8: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Paul Harrison near Major, Sask.

Dec. 9: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Leda Laliberte near Beaver River in northern Sask.

Dec. 12: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Shelly Gerein near Scott, Sask.

Dec. 13: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken Gloria Katsiris on Jackfish Lake, Sask.

Dec. 14: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Denny Klatt‎ in Lampman, Sask.

Dec. 15: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Micheal Lessard near La Ronge, Sask.

Dec. 16: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Scott Aspinall.

Dec. 19: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Jill Apshkrum. Frost and a combine was an all-too-common site this year, as harvest was drawn out.

Jill Apshkrum/Submitted

Dec. 20: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Joanna Komorek.

Dec. 21: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Kelly Pankratz near Saskatoon.

Dec. 22: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Gina Rea on Murray Lake.

Dec. 23: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Craig Boehm near Regina.

Dec. 28: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Jay Riedel.

Dec. 29: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Barbie Krushlucki near Wascana Park.

Dec. 30: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Eldon Laird near Prince Albert, SK.


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24 Nov -

Winnipeg family builds epic backyard ice rink in North Kildonan

WINNIPEG —; A Winnipeg family has finished laying down the ice, nailing in the benches and putting up the scoreboard, creating an extravagant ice rink right in their own backyard.

This is the third year Jeff and Leslie Scarcello decided to build a rink in their North Kildonan yard.

“I’ve always wanted to build one. I grew up with a skating rink in my backyard,” Scarcello said.

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“We have little kids and it’s hard to find open ice time for them, and getting them packed up and driving them somewhere can be difficult.”

RELATED: Saskatoon dad’s labour of love is building the best backyard ice rink

That’s when Scarcello decided to bring the ice rink to his family.

“It’s the idea of being able to skate right outside your house and quickly put on your skates,” he said.

The outdoor rink, which is 32 feet wide and 64 feet long, has boards, a bench to rest your feet, a fire pit to stay warm, and even a scoreboard that lights up.

WATCH: Aerial shot of the rink in North Kildonan

Jeff said the rink may be “overkill,” but it allows his family and friends to hold New Year’s Eve skating parties and pond hockey games.

“We had an early Christmas party with family last week … and 15 people came and brought their skates.”

Manitobans are getting into the winter spirit and building their own personal rinks.

Leslie Scarcello

Building the rink

Building an outdoor rink in your own backyard is not an easy task. But Scarcello said the help of his neighbours, it’s made the process much easier.

“In October we had boards and support already built. We had neighbours come over and help shovel the snow, help get the lights up, putting down the hockey flooring mat and mesh,” he said.

Once the foundation is built then it’s time to run the water, which can take nearly two days, he said. Then when the weather is cold enough, it freezes over, needs to be scraped, and it’s ready to go, Scarcello said.

WATCH: Creating a backyard skating rink

The rink isn’t just for the family, Jeff said, it’s also for the neighbourhood.

“Sometimes we are sitting watching television inside, and lights pop up outside and neighbours start skating … it’s open for everyone,” Scarcello said.

Do you have a backyard ice rink you would like Global News to write about?

Note: We may use your response in this or other stories. While we may contact you to follow up we won’t publish your contact info.

24 Nov -

Mother of boys killed in Spruce Grove stresses she had primary care in online post

In a heartbreaking comment on Facebook, responding to a news article about her sons’ death, mother Tracy Stark clarified the custody arrangement.

“I will clear one thing up: this monster didn’t have primary care!” she wrote of the boys’ father. “He was given one school year with these boys so they could play hockey in Spruce Grove.

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    Apparent murder-suicide leaves two boys dead in Spruce Grove

    “I raised these babies with my husband Brent in Whitecourt their entire lives,” Stark added.

    “He had four months with them and he took them away.”

    READ MORE: 3 people found dead in Spruce Grove house, 2 were children 

    On Monday morning, the bodies of 11-year-old Radek MacDougall and 13-year-old Ryder MacDougall were found inside a home in Spruce Grove. The body of their father, 39-year-old Corry MacDougall, was also found in the home.

    On Tuesday, RCMP confirmed the deaths as a double murder and suicide.

    Insp. Gibson Glavin wouldn’t comment on how the boys died.

    “The adult was responsible, criminally responsible, for the deaths of the two boys,” he said Wednesday.

    “After we’ve had an opportunity to collect what evidence is available where the event happened and talk to the people who can tell us anything they know about what happened and get the reports from the medical examiner, we turn now to looking back. Was there anything that indicated that something could have been happening to prevent this that police could have been a part of, should have been a part of?”

    Court documents show that for years, the couple argued over custody, visitation, child support and treatment of the children.

    Glavin said the RCMP investigation is not closed by any means.

    “It’s not open because we don’t know what occurred; it’s open because we want to understand what occurred better.”

    He said it was a “very tough” scene for investigators, but added it is their professional duty to work the case and provide answers for the family and community.

    READ MORE: ‘Beautiful souls’: Stepfather of 2 boys found dead in Spruce Grove home speaks out

    Brent Stark, the boys’ stepfather, described them as young, determined, “beautiful souls” who were enthusiastic hockey players and dedicated to their family, sports and their education.

    Hundreds of people gathered in Whitecourt, Alta. on Dec. 20, 2016 at a vigil held for Radek and Ryder MacDougall.

    Global News

    Hundreds of people gathered in Whitecourt, Alta. on Dec. 20, 2016 at a vigil held for Radek and Ryder MacDougall.

    Global News

    Hundreds of people gathered in Whitecourt, Alta. on Dec. 20, 2016 at a vigil held for Radek and Ryder MacDougall.

    Global News

    Hundreds of people gathered in Whitecourt, Alta. on Dec. 20, 2016 at a vigil held for Radek and Ryder MacDougall.

    Global News

    Hundreds of people gathered in Whitecourt, Alta. on Dec. 20, 2016 at a vigil held for Radek and Ryder MacDougall.

    Global News

    Hundreds of people gathered in Whitecourt, Alta. on Dec. 20, 2016 at a vigil held for Radek and Ryder MacDougall.

    Global News

    Family members lit lanterns to send up to Radek and Ryder MacDougall in heaven at a vigil held for the slain boys in held in Whitecourt, Alta. on Dec. 20, 2016.

    Craig Ryan/ Global News

    Hundreds of people gathered in Whitecourt, Alta. on Dec. 20, 2016 at a vigil held for Radek and Ryder MacDougall.

    Craig Ryan/ Global News

    A shrine is set up in Whitecourt, Alta. on Dec. 20, 2016 near a vigil held for Radek and Ryder MacDougall.

    Craig Ryan/ Global News

    Hundreds of people gathered in Whitecourt, Alta. on Dec. 20, 2016 at a vigil held for Radek and Ryder MacDougall.

    Global News

    Hundreds of people gathered in Whitecourt, Alta. on Dec. 20, 2016 at a vigil held for Radek and Ryder MacDougall.

    Craig Ryan/ Global News

    Hundreds of people gathered in Whitecourt, Alta. on Dec. 20, 2016 at a vigil held for Radek and Ryder MacDougall.

    Craig Ryan/ Global News

    Tracy Stark and Brent Stark speak at a vigil for the Radek and Ryder MacDougall held in Whitecourt, Alta. on Dec. 20, 2016.

    Craig Ryan/ Global News

    Tracy Stark and Brent Stark speak at a vigil for the Radek and Ryder MacDougall held in Whitecourt, Alta. on Dec. 20, 2016.

    Craig Ryan/ Global News

    Radek and Ryder MacDougall’s mother, Tracy Stark, is consoled by their stepfather – Brent Stark – at a vigil for the two boys held in Whitecourt, Alta. on Dec. 20, 2016.

    Craig Ryan/ Global News

    Radek and Ryder MacDougall’s mother, Tracy Stark, is consoled by their stepfather – Brent Stark – at a vigil for the two boys held in Whitecourt, Alta. on Dec. 20, 2016.

    Craig Ryan/ Global News

    The boys played with the Spruce Grove Minor Hockey Association, whose president posted a statement online calling the deaths an “unimaginable tragedy.”

    They were both students at the nearby Greystone Centennial Middle School, Parkland School Division No. 70 confirmed. Ryder was in Grade 8; Radek was in Grade 6.

    READ MORE: Family of boys found murdered west of Edmonton speak at vigil: ‘never forget them’ 

    Brent and Tracy Stark spoke at the end of a vigil in Whitecourt Tuesday night.

    “I know Ryder and Radek are looking down and I just, I just don’t know what to say,” Tracy said. “I know they’re going to give you strength to get through this, as they do me and everybody else.

    “I just thank you for being here and supporting and loving us. Just never forget them I guess.”

    Watch below: Family of the two boys killed in a Spruce Grove home speak at a vigil in Whitecourt.

    With files from Karen Bartko and Phil Heidenreich, Global News

24 Nov -

Year in review 2016: 10 sports moments even non-sports fans talked about

Great video is synonymous with sports and the highlights athletes provide every year.

Slow motion video and sideline cameras allow sports fans to re-live the unbelievable plays they see on television.

READ MORE: 10 big Canadian sport stories from 2016

But sometimes there are moments within games that transcend sport. Moments that go beyond just “jock talk” and captivate a broader audience.

There were more than a few stories in 2016 that left the field of play and splashed their way onto screens and newspapers around the world. Here are 10 sports events that had you talking this year.

Barack Obama trolls Phil Kessel during Penguins’ White House visit

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    Phil Kessel has found himself the focus of jokes and scorn on more than one occasion – especially as a member of the Toronto Maple Leafs.

    But this year he grabbed the attention of President Barack Obama.

    During a visit to The White House to celebrate the Pittsburgh Penguins’ Stanley Cup victory, Obama led off the ceremony by taking a jab at Kessel.

    It’s hard to imagine the Commander-in-Chief was that familiar with the unassuming scorer prior to this summer. But a tweet Kessel posted in September about being left off the U.S. men’s national team following their embarrassing exit at the World Cup of Hockey proved he can dish jokes as well as he can take them.

    Ryan Lochte lies about being robbed by armed men during Rio Games

    CCTV video shows US swimmers at Rio gas station

    02:59

    CCTV video shows US swimmers at Rio gas station

02:59

Brazilian Police release video showing US swimmers attending a party

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Ryan Lochte: ‘I left details out…And I over-exaggerated’ after he said he was robbed while in Rio

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Ryan Lochte rushed by 2 protesters during ‘Dancing with the Stars’ taping



The Olympics always provide a plethora of stories that have the ability to cross over into the mainstream, and 2016 was no different.

A Russian doping scandal, Rio’s water quality, Penny Oleksiak, Aurélie Rivard, Andre De Grasse, Usain Bolt and Michael Phelps all grabbed headlines.

But it was Phelps’ teammates, including Ryan Lochte, whose actions out of the pool overshadowed competition.

Lochte and his teammates were involved in an early-morning drunken encounter at a Rio gas station during which, they later claimed, they were threatened and robbed by gunmen.

The incident garnered international attention, and soon police and media began to poke holes in the swimmers’ timeline of events.

Lochte fled the country, but was later charged by Brazilian police for making a false robbery report.

USA Swimming banned him from competition for 10 months.

Lochte was also dumped by several sponsors and was rushed by two men wearing anti-Lochte T-shirts while performing on Dancing with the Stars this fall.

Ronaldo shows Euro 2016 frustration by throwing reporter’s microphone in lake

Another sports star showed off some bad behaviour in June during the summer’s other major international tournament.

Cristiano Ronaldo, who had been struggling early in the Euro 2016 tournament, took out his frustrations on a reporter’s microphone during practice.

Asked if he was ready for his next match, Ronaldo responded by snatching the microphone and throwing it into a lake.

The release of tension worked, as Ronaldo scored his first two goals of the tournament in his next match, eventually leading his country to its first Euro championship with a win over France.

Sportsmanship shines through on and off the soccer pitch

Athletes can sometimes let their “celebrity status” cloud their judgement, but more often than not sport brings out the best in people, and no moment proved that more this year than in Paris’ “fan zone” following France’s loss to Portugal in the Euro 2016 final.

Euronews cameras captured a touching moment as a little Portuguese fan approached a sobbing French fan to offer a pat on the arm and some words of encouragement.

The touching moment resulted in the two fans embracing – the little Portuguese fan consoling the man with a hug.

A similar display was shown by Barcelona’s youth soccer team after winning the U-12 Junior Soccer World Challenge in August.

Barcelona’s under-12 “Infantil B” side defeated Japanese team Omiya Ardija 1-0 in the championship.

After losing such a close match in front of their home crowd, some Omiya players broke down in tears. 

Within moments, the Barca players noticed their opponent’s distress and came over to offer hugs and handshakes.

MLB player retires after team tells him son isn’t welcome in clubhouse

Classy acts carried over into baseball, with one player in particular choosing family values over money.

Adam LaRoche was set to earn $13 million this past summer, but abruptly announced his retirement from baseball in March, after reportedly being told by the Chicago White Sox that his son, Drake, had exceeded his welcome in the clubhouse.

Drake had been a presence with the team in previous seasons, but due to disappointing play from LaRoche in 2015, the club decided the 36-year-old would have to reduce Drake’s time in the clubhouse by half as a way of refocusing his attention on baseball.

That didn’t sit well with LaRoche as he quit his 12-year career in the Majors.

Blue Jays season highlighted by beer cans, punches being thrown

“Classy” would not be a word used to describe the major stories that followed the Toronto Blue Jays this summer.

The club entered the season with hopes of improving on their long 2015 post-season run, highlighted by Jose Bautista‘s epic bat flip against the Texas Rangers.

That toss would lead to more fireworks in the spring when Texas’ Rougned Odor got revenge by punching the Blue Jays slugger in the face during a game on May 15.

Judging which player was in the wrong was decidedly split between fans of both teams. Nevertheless, the punch knocked some sense into the Blue Jays players.

The club was two games below .500 at that point, but wound up posting the third best record in the American League the rest of the season, good enough to clinch a wild card berth back to the post-season.

It was in that game that a Toronto fan tossed a beer can onto the field in the direction of an Orioles player.

The incident immediately brought back ugly memories of beer cans being thrown on the field during the post-season game against Odor’s Rangers the year before.

The beer can controversy overwhelmed watercooler talk and sparked a 48 hour manhunt to find the culprit, who eventually turned himself into police.

Tenors singer changes ‘O Canada’ lyrics to ‘All Lives Matter’

Canadian band The Tenors found themselves inducted in the pantheon of bizarre national anthem renditions when one of their members altered the lyrics to ‘O Canada’ to include “All lives matter to the brave” during their performance prior to the MLB All-Star Game in San Diego in July.

Singer Remigio Pereira‘s very public statement against the Black Lives Matter movement received instant backlash online.

The Tenors said Pereira was ‘acting as a lone wolf,’ and announced hours after the performance that he had been removed from the group.

49ers QB Colin Kaepernick refuses to stand for U.S. anthem in protest

NFL quarterback refuses to stand for US anthem

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NFL quarterback refuses to stand for US anthem

00:48

49ers Kaepernick and teammate kneel during national anthem

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Backlash against 49ers quarterback Kaepernick over American anthem stance

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49ers fans burn Colin Kaepernick jerseys in anger after QB refuses to stand during national anthem

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Kaepernick ‘exercising his constitutional right to make a statement’: Obama

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NFL ratings are way down due to Colin Kaepernick: Donald Trump



NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick also found himself at the centre of an anthem scandal in August after deciding to remain seated during the singing of the ‘Star Spangled Banner’ prior to a preseason game.

Kaepernick explained that he would not “stand up to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses black people and people of colour.”

The statement was in reaction to several police shootings across the U.S. that targeted black males.

“To me, this is bigger than football and it would be selfish on my part to look the other way,” he said. “There are bodies in the street and people getting paid leave and getting away with murder.”

Kaepernick received harsh criticism from fans, professional athletes and even Donald Trump.

Kaepernick has continued his protest throughout the NFL season, and says he will continue until he sees change.

“When there’s significant change and I feel like that flag represents what it’s supposed to represent, this country is representing people the way that it’s supposed to, I’ll stand.”

Ryder Cup heckler sinks putt for $100

An American fan overheard heckling Europe’s Ryder Cup team in September was given the chance to back up his talk – and he delivered in spectacular fashion.

The incident happened during a public training session in Minnesota as the Europe team practiced their putting ahead of the tournament. The heckler was challenged by Europe team players to sink a putt for $100 after the man was overheard boasting that he could make that same putt they were missing.

After lining up the putt, David Johnson, an insurance salesman from North Dakota, said he closed his eyes, hit it – and sunk it. The crowd broke into chants of “USA! USA!” as the European players swarmed Johnson to congratulate him.

Pro surfer fights off shark during competition in South Africa

Another incredible moment caught on camera came in July during a surf competition in South Africa, when a surfer came face to face with a great white shark.

Three-time world champion Mick Fanning was in the water with his surfboard when a shark’s fin appeared.

Fanning said he punched the shark in an effort to fight it off and that he was “totally tripping out” after the close call.

With files from The Associated Press, Reuters and Global News

24 Nov -

Poker star Phil Ivey ordered to return $10M to casino for ‘edge-sorting’

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. — Poker pro Phil Ivey and a companion must return more than US$10 million they won from an Atlantic City casino while playing cards that were arranged in a certain way to give the players an edge.

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A federal judge had previously ruled Ivey and companion player Cheng Yin Sun didn’t meet their obligation to follow gambling regulations on four occasions in 2012 by having a dealer at the Borgata arrange baccarat cards so they could tell what kind of card was coming next.

Last week the judge ordered the pair to return US$10.1 million to the casino. The order by U.S. District Court Judge Noel Hillman essentially returned both sides to where they were before Ivey and Sun began gambling at the Borgata.

READ MORE:
Poker star Phil Ivey broke gambling rules in $10M Atlantic City win

The sum includes money that Ivey won playing craps with some of the money he won at the card table.

“This case involves the whims of Lady Luck, who casts uncertainty on every hand, despite the house odds,” Hillman wrote in his opinion. “Indeed, Lady Luck is like nectar to gamblers, because no one would otherwise play a game he knows he will always lose.”

He added that deciding the case involved “voiding a contract that was tainted from the beginning and breached as soon as it was executed.”

Ed Jacobs, the attorney for the nine-time World Series of Poker bracelet winner, stressed that the judge affirmed that Ivey had followed every rule of baccarat and did not commit fraud.

“What this ruling says is a player is prohibited from combining his skill and intellect and visual acuity to beat the casino at its own game,” he said, adding Ivey will appeal the ruling soon. “The casino agreed to every single accommodation requested by Phil Ivey in his four visits because they were eager to try to win his money.”

The judge rejected a request by the casino to use a formula for calculating damages that could have seen the restitution go as high as US$15.5 million. That method, assessing how much the casino could have won had Ivey and Sun not engaged in a style of play known as edge-sorting, was deemed too speculative.

READ MORE:
Gamblers in unshuffled cards case beg judge to let them keep $1.5M in winnings

The Borgata claimed the pair exploited a defect in cards that enabled them to sort and arrange good cards. The casino says the technique violates state casino gambling regulations. But Ivey asserts his win was simply the result of skill and good observation.

The Borgata claimed the cards used in the games were defective in that the pattern on the back was not uniform. The cards have rows of small white circles designed to look like the tops of cut diamonds, but the Borgata said some of them were only half-diamonds or quarters. Ivey has said he simply noticed things that anyone playing the game could have observed and bet accordingly.

The judge noted that Ivey and Sun instructed dealers to arrange the cards in a certain way, which is permitted under the rules of the game, after Sun noticed minute differences in them. But he ruled in October that those actions violated the state Casino Control Act and their contractual obligation to abide by it in gambling at the casino.

Neither the casino nor Ivey’s lawyer immediately responded to requests for comment Monday.

The judge rejected a request by the Borgata that Ivey repay nearly US$250,000 in comps — listed only as “goods and services” — the casino extended him while playing there.

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24 Nov -

Your Saskatchewan – Saskatoon: December 2016

Every day on Global News at 6 and Global News at 10, we feature a viewer submitted photo for Your Saskatchewan.

To submit a picture for Your Saskatchewan, email to [email protected]长沙夜网.

Pictures should be at least 920 pixels wide and in jpeg format.

GALLERY: Your Saskatchewan – Saskatoon: November 2016

Dec. 1: Jodine Siebert took this Your Saskatchewan photo near Borden.

Jodine Siebert / Viewer Submitted

Dec. 2: Chris Hartman took this Your Saskatchewan photo in Regina.

Chris Hartman / Viewer Submitted

Dec. 3: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Tammie McGonigal near Rosetown.

Tammie McGonigal / Supplied

Dec. 4: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Jason Field near Waldheim.

Jason Field / Supplied

Dec. 5: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Gloria Katsiris at Jackfish Lake.

Gloria Katsiris / Supplied

Dec. 6: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Robert Johnson of a bison bearing through Monday’s blizzard near Fairlight.

Robert Johnson / Supplied

Dec. 7: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Jenalle Tari Bahm in Kerrobert.

Jenalle Tari Bahm / Supplied

Dec. 8: Tammie McGonigal took this Your Saskatchewan photo near Rosetown.

Tammie McGonigal / Viewer Submitted

Dec. 10: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Eldon Laird north of Prince Albert.

Eldon Laird / Supplied

Dec. 11: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Heather Godwin at Tantallon.

Heather Godwin / Supplied

Dec. 12: Pervaiz Iqbal took this Your Saskatchewan photo in Saskatoon.

Pervaiz Iqbalb / Viewer Submitted

Dec. 13: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Gina Rea at Murray Lake.

Gina Rea / Viewer Submitted

Dec. 14: Garfield MacGillivray snapped this Your Saskatchewan photo at Quill Lake.

Garfield MacGillivray / Viewer Submitted

Dec. 15: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken at Belle Plaine by Scott Aspinall.

Scott Aspinall / Viewer Submitted

Dec. 16: Lucas Carrier took this Your Saskatchewan photo in Stony Rapids.

Lucas Carrier / Viewer Submitted

Dec. 17: This Your Saskatchewan photo of the supermoon was taken by Kitiara Martens near Hepburn.

Kitiara Martens / Viewer Submitted

Dec. 18: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken near Corning by Shelby King.

Shelby King / Viewer Submitted

Dec. 19: Cam Leslie took this Your Saskatchewan photo of a sundog on Dec. 17 at Lake Diefenbaker.

Cam Leslie / Viewer Submitted

Dec. 20: Can you spot the snow owl in this Your Saskatchewan photo taken by Jenine Boser near Unity?

Jenine Boser / Viewer Submitted

Dec. 21: Krista Sharpe took this Your Saskatchewan photo of Mission Ridge Winter Park at Fort Qu’Appelle.

Krista Sharpe / Viewer Submitted

Dec. 22: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Leslie Anderson in Prince Albert.

Leslie Anderson / Viewer Submitted

Dec. 23: Karen Smith took this Your Saskatchewan photo in Wilkie.

Karen Smith / Viewer Submitted

Dec. 24: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken in Viceroy by Stephanie Schneck.

Stephanie Schneck / Viewer Submitted

Dec. 26: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Carol Couillonneur at Île-à-la-Crosse.

Carol Couillonneur / Viewer Submitted

Dec. 27: Kevin Neabel snapped this Your Saskatchewan photo in Saskatoon.

Kevin Neabel / Viewer Submitted

Dec. 28: This Your Saskatchewan photo of fertilizer domes was taken in Hanley by Susan Sagen.

Susan Sagen / Viewer Submitted

Dec. 29: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Margaret Flack near Vanscoy.

Margaret Flack / Viewer Submitted

Dec. 30: Scott Aspinall took this Your Saskatchewan photo in Pilot Butte.

Scott Aspinall / Viewer Submitted

Dec. 31: This Your Saskatchewan photo of Lake Diefenbaker was taken by Maria Steinson.

Maria Steinson / Viewer Submitted


ChangSha Night Net

Related

  • Your Saskatchewan – Saskatoon: October 2016

  • Your Saskatchewan – Saskatoon: September 2016

  • Your Saskatchewan – Saskatoon: August 2016

24 Nov -

Berlin attack: German police on manhunt for ‘violent and armed’ Tunisian asylum-seeker Anis Amri

BERLIN – Germany on Wednesday launched a Europe-wide manhunt for a “violent and armed” Tunisian man with ties to Islamic extremists who has used at least six different names and three different nationalities, saying he is a suspect in the Berlin Christmas market attack.

A German security official said that authorities had considered him a possible terror threat previously and had been trying to deport him after his asylum application was rejected this summer.

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READ MORE: German investigators seek Tunisian man in Christmas market attack

Germany issued a notice to other European countries overnight seeking the arrest of 24-year-old Anis Amri, but initially held off on going public so as not to jeopardize the manhunt. After German media published photos of him and a partial name, federal prosecutors went public with the information.

Federal prosecutors described Amri as of average height and weight, with black hair and brown eyes.

“Caution: He could be violent and armed,” the notice warned. “A reward of up to 100,000 euros ($105,000) has been issued for information leading to the suspect’s arrest.”

A separate European arrest warrant from Germany obtained by The Associated Press states that Amri has at times used at least six different names and three different nationalities.

“This is a suspect, not necessarily the perpetrator,” Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere said after briefing Parliament’s domestic affairs committee. “We are still investigating in all directions.”

WATCH: Toronto Christmas market steps up security following Berlin attack

Twelve people were killed and 48 injured when a truck plowed into a popular Berlin market Monday evening in an attack claimed by the Islamic State group. Twelve of the wounded were still being treated Wednesday for very serious injuries and some were in critical condition, Berlin health officials said.

De Maiziere wouldn’t give details on the new suspect, but committee members said he’s believed to be Tunisian and had spent time in pre-deportation detention.

The man is in his early 20s and apparently has used various identities, said Stephan Mayer, a senior lawmaker with Germany’s governing conservatives. He said the man was considered part of the “Salafist-Islamist scene” by authorities.

READ MORE: Berlin police release suspect in deadly Christmas market truck attack

Germany’s chief federal prosecutor told lawmakers that “this Tunisian is a solid lead, his wallet was found in the cab of the truck, but that it’s not clear that he was also the perpetrator,” said Burkhard Lischka of the Social Democrats, the junior governing party.

The new suspect apparently arrived in Germany in July 2015 and lived in three German regions since February, mostly in Berlin, said Ralf Jaeger, the interior minister of western North Rhine-Westphalia state.

Jaeger told reporters on Wednesday that state police had launched proceedings against the man on suspicion that he was preparing a serious crime. He said “security agencies exchanged information about this person in the joint counter-terrorism centre, the last time in November.”

WATCH: Global News reporter recounts Berlin attack

Separately, the man’s asylum application was rejected in July. German authorities prepared to deport him but weren’t able to do so because he didn’t have valid identity papers, Jaeger said. In August they started trying to get him a replacement passport.

“Tunisia at first denied that this person was its citizen, and the papers weren’t issued for a long time,” Jaeger said. “They arrived today.”

READ MORE: Berlin Christmas market truck tragedy described by witnesses

A Tunisian official said German investigators are trying to determine the role of the man, who he said was named Anis Amri. The official, speaking on condition of anonymity before Germans spoke more about the investigation, said Tunisian authorities were requesting more information on the German probe into the suspect.

A Tunisian living in France was shot to death after carrying out a similar attack on July 14 Bastille Day revelers in the southern French city of Nice, killing 86 people.

Police in Berlin said they had received over 500 tips on the Monday evening attack.

VIDEO: Cell phone video shows moments after truck slams into Christmas market in Berlin

Shortly after the attack, police arrested a Pakistani man found a kilometre (1/2 mile) from the market who matched witness descriptions of the truck’s driver. However, they released him the next day, saying they did not have evidence tying him to the attack.

The claim of responsibility carried on the IS group’s Amaq news agency late Tuesday did not identify the man seen fleeing from the truck, but described him as “a soldier of the Islamic State” who “carried out the attack in response to calls for targeting citizens of the Crusader coalition.”

READ MORE: Berlin attack: Germans share messages of strength after Christmas market attack

Germany’s top prosecutor, Peter Frank, told reporters before the IS claim that the attack was reminiscent of the Nice rampage and appeared to follow instructions published by IS. He also said it wasn’t clear whether there was one perpetrator or several.

Christmas shoppers were out again in the streets Wednesday in the German capital, and Berlin Mayor Michael Mueller said it was “good to see that Berliners aren’t being intimidated.”

WATCH: Hundreds attend Berlin vigil for victims of Christmas market attack

“I don’t think there’s any need to be afraid,” he told ZDF television. “The police presence has been significantly heightened … and of course other measures taken to find the perpetrator quickly.”

Mueller argued that there are limits to increasing security, given the number of public spaces and events.

“It wouldn’t be our free and open life any more if we escalated security measures so much that people worry about going anywhere, that there are strict entry checks,” he said. “We don’t want that. It must be appropriate and goal-oriented.”

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